The Meaning of Life

Russian Language, Literature and Culture 215

Usual Description

Life was grim in nineteenth-century Russia! Faced with an oppressive political system, overwhelming evidence of suffering, poverty, and appalling ignorance, the imperfectability of human nature and the messiness of personal relationships, and, finally, the specter of death, Russian writers had ample opportunity to ponder the meaning–and meaningless–of existence. Their attempts to grapple with the “cursed questions” of life gave rise to an extraordinarily rich existentialist tradition. Drawing on classic works by Pushkin, Gogol, Tolstoy, Dostoevsky, Chekhov and others, the course will take a sane, upbeat, and irreverent approach to some timeless and very serious issues. Taught in English.

Areas of Interest
Russia
Russia
Time Periods

1800 - 1899

Course Listings

These are all of the listings of this course recorded in the Oberlin course catalog since the fall of 2007.

Listing Semester Professor
Russian Language, Literature and Culture 215 Taught by Thomas Newlin
Russian Language, Literature and Culture 215
Russian Language, Literature and Culture 215 Taught by Thomas Newlin
Russian Language, Literature and Culture 215 Taught by Thomas Newlin
Russian Language, Literature and Culture 215 Taught by Thomas Newlin